EEE PC Redux

My EEE PC 901 was great. The only problem was that I couldn’t stand the keyboard and so our romance ended abruptly.

always have paris.jpgThis made me sad, so it was banished to the back of my workspace. It stayed there until I realized that I was never going to love it the way it deserved to be loved, so I sold it cheap to a friend. Goodbye 901. We’ll always have Paris.

The next day, my new sweetheart, the EEE PC 1005HA arrived.

(If you want some unboxing pr0n and comparative, check out the engadget article)

Naturally due to the weird nature of my work and interests, this laptop has to be a tri-boot between Windows, Linux, and OSX.

The details on installing Windows (if you don’t like the pre-installed version) are well documented elsewhere, but there always seems to be a lot of bad advice surrounding Linux. The Linux community is a continually devolving process which is pretty ugly to watch. Things that work great get abandoned so that someone else can get their name on something new that does the same thing. Distributions (and open source projects in general) can fork and fork again until they some have a small userbase and do not have enough volunteers to support its efforts well.

This is the sad state of Linux-affairs that leaves most users confused and asking questions like “what is the best?” in areas where the clueless post links to huge lists of distributions and leave them to figure it out.

It isn’t any huge surprise that many just forget about it altogether, get a Apple product, install MacPorts/Fink and Xcode, and run their open source software.

im_a_pc_mac_linux_bsd_tronguy_hippie.jpg

Historically, my own timeline with open source operating systems (not UNIX, remember) at work is as follows:

  • Early 90s: Slackware, RedHat (moving to mostly FreeBSD for servers in late 90s and beyond)
  • Post-2000: Gentoo (on desktops) and Fedora on laptops (even during Windows consulting gigs)
  • Middle naughts: OSX, FreeBSD (still), Linux and Windows largely in VMs or on special purpose machines.
  • 2010: We’ll see. A chassis/desktop/laptop/netbook/palmtop hierarchy seems to be taking shape.

Anyway, back to the 1005HA. A 10.5 hour battery. Seriously.

angle-shiny.jpg

Also a winning keyboard this time.

006.jpg

Wimax + Netbook = Awesome and portable. Perfect for taking notes, a quick update to something, and social networks or email.

As I went into at length before, the array.org kernel and system-specific tweaking work was some of the best. Thankfully, it is still alive and absorbed into a more polished effort: Eeebuntu.

3 responses to “EEE PC Redux

  1. Which laptop/ultraportable/netbook will allow me to cut-copy-paste the human brain?

    Technology is lagging. The Eee PC looks like any laptop circa 1995.

    “The Linux community is a continually devolving process which is pretty ugly to watch. Things that work great get abandoned so that someone else can get their name on something new that does the same thing. Distributions (and open source projects in general) can fork and fork again until they some have a small userbase and do not have enough volunteers to support its efforts well”.

    The above has been true about Linux since 1995. FreeBSD was always more structured and well-organized (at least until Mac OS X destroyed it by only using the kernel).

    WiMax will never come to fruition. WiFi has made me waste tens of hours more than wired Ethernet over the past decade on troubleshooting, configuration, and other menial and annoying tasks (while completely removing all of the security-benefits of a physical wire).

    Huge trackpads, multi-touch, and small keyboards have blighted my ability to type 120 wpm. I think IBM^H^H^HLenovo still makes laptops^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hnetbooks with Touchpoints. Oh wait… but they also include a huge trackpad which extends my fingers from the keyboard about 3 more inches away from my wrists.

    Software was at its worst in 2009 — a trend which will certainly continue into the next decade. The inherent principles underlying quality control in software are gone at every ISV. Software weaknesses that allow common exploitation through easy security vulnerabilities are a 5-minute fuzzer away.

    • Is this getting closer to what you want in mobility, Andre?

      I think Wimax may make it for the same reasons the cable industry has become the baseline broadband provider; for lack of completely lack of decent alternatives.

  2. @Andre: Really, OS 10 destroyed BSD? Are you high? It made it the most popular Linux distro ever. Ya know, much better than your average mommy basement dwelling losers distro.

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